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Selected Literature

Literature about the history of Jewish sports

Prof. Dr. Lorenz Peiffer
sports historian

Own works

Co-author/collaboration

pp. 58-65: Forgotten Roots. The history of the Jewish gymnastics clubs in Leibzig up to 1939. 

P. 83-93: Why historical remembrance is so important.

pp. 60-61: Jewish football

P. 161-177: The role of Jewish sports in the Main metropolis of Frankfurt before and after January 30, 1933.

P.46-65: "The Hamburgers had their best team effort in their right wing". On the history of Jewish football in Hamburg in the 1920s and 1930s.

P.193-206: "All Jews, including baptized ones, are to be struck off the list of members". The Aryanization of German Sport and its Significance for the Realization of the National Socialist Community

P.46-49: An opportunity seized. on the culture of remembrance in German football

S.315-334/ S.87-106: Jewish football clubs in the Palatinate and in the area of ​​today's Rhineland-Palatinate in the 190s and 1930s. 

P.63-82: "Today it is important to open our ranks to all Jewish athletes who have become homeless." - The self-organization of Jewish football in the shadow of discrimination and persecution in National Socialist Germany

P.7-28: Sport saved his life twice. Franz Orgler on his 100th birthday - a biographical sketch.

P.249-273: Jews in sport - a part of German social history.

P.44-47: Pass to freedom. How a Jewish soccer team traveled from Nazi Germany to the Maccabiah in 1935.

p.34: Lost Heroes. From Gottfried Fuchs to Walther Bensemann - The expulsion of Jews from German football after 1933. 

P.133-155: "...that the Beuthen team will make a viable opponent after diligent training".

P.55-86: Jewish sport and sport of the Jews in Germany. An annotated bibliography. A continuation and addition.

P.767-781: The exclusion of Jewish members from the German gymnastics and sports clubs as reflected in association magazines.

P.77-102: The history of Jewish sports in Westphalia before and during the Nazi era.

P.149-156: "Plaything" of the Nazis

P.183-187: Berlin police athletes defy Nazi racial policy

P.230-234: Julius Hirsch - The murdered national player.

P.255-260: From Olympic champions to "enemies of the Reich" - The cousins ​​Alfred and Gustav Felix Flatow.

P.275-279: "Farewell to the gymnastics club" - The farewell letter from the Wrocław gymnast Meta Fuss-Opet.

P.199-210: The exclusion of Jewish members from German gymnastics and sports clubs after 1933. An investigation of various mechanisms and dynamics.

P.141-159: A meeting place for the community: Sport in German-Jewish social life before and after 1933.

P.217-229: The exclusion of Jews from German gymnastics and sports clubs in 1933 and the silence after 1945: Old and new perspectives of German sports historiography.

P.177-192: Gretel Bergmann – celebrated, persecuted and then forgotten? Achievements and fate of a Jewish sportswoman in Germany.

P.55-70: Part of society - Jewish athletes in Berlin

dr Henry Wahlig
sports historian

Own works

Co-author/collaboration

p.34: Lost Heroes. From Gottfried Fuchs to Walther Bensemann - The expulsion of Jews from German football after 1933


P.210-213: Max Girgulski's championship jersey 

P.230-233: The exclusion of the Jewish member Franz Anton Salmon from 1. FC Nürnberg 


P. 26-27: Outcast Heroes /Magazine for Historical Education 34

Edition 1: The year of upheaval 1933: From the apolitical football paper to the medium loyal to the line

Edition 2: The kicker, a tool of spiritual warfare 

P. 40-50: Jews in German football and the long road to active remembrance work

P. 763-773: Jews in sports in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism

P.793-797: Jews in sport in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism.

p. 798.801: Jews in Sport in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism 

P. 802-804: Jews in sports in the Weimar Republic and under National Socialism

P.58-65: On the move. Milestones in Leipzig's sports history.

P.83-93: Holocaust commemoration _ soccer and memories

P. 193-206: "All Jews, including baptized ones, are to be removed from the list of members". The Aryanization of German Sport and its Significance for the Realization of the National Socialist Community. The place of the “Volksgemeinschaft” in German social history.

P. 46-49: Ten years of the DFB Cultural Foundation.

P. 11-28: "Regain equal rights in sport in our German homeland". The activities of the Jewish sports group Bentheim.

P. 220-234: Osnabrück and sport under National Socialism

P.59-71: Put aside. Jewish football in the Ruhr area

P.44-47: Pass to freedom. How a Jewish soccer team traveled from Nazi Germany to the Maccabiah in 1935.

S: 249-273: Jews in sport - a part of German social history.

P. 7-28: Sport saved his life twice. Franz Orgler on his 100th birthday - a biographical sketch

pp. 63-82: "Today it is important to open our row to all Jewish athletes who have become homeless". The self-organization of Jewish football in the shadow of discrimination and persecution in Nazi Germany.

P. 175-184: Introduction and commentary on the document section

P. 73-98: The participation of Jewish athletes from Germany in the II. Makkabiah 1935 in Tel Aviv

P. 77-103: The history of Jewish sports in Westphalia before and during the Nazi era

P. 55-86: Jewish sport and sport of the Jews in Germany. An annotated bibliography. 

P. 767-782: The exclusion of Jewish members from German gymnastics and sports clubs as reflected in association magazines

P.241-247: Suicides by Jewish athletes under National Socialism: The examples of Fritz Rosenfelder and Nelly Neppach

P.63-82: "Today it is important to open our ranks to all Jewish athletes who have become homeless." - The self-organization of Jewish football in the shadow of discrimination and persecution in National Socialist Germany

P.7-28: Sport saved his life twice. Franz Orgler on his 100th birthday - a biographical sketch.

P.249-273: Jews in sport - a part of German social history.

P.44-47: Pass to freedom. How a Jewish soccer team traveled from Nazi Germany to the Maccabiah in 1935.

p.34: Lost Heroes. From Gottfried Fuchs to Walther Bensemann - The expulsion of Jews from German football after 1933. 

P.133-155: "...that the Beuthen team will make a viable opponent after diligent training".

P. 141-159: A meeting place for the community. Sport in German-Jewish social life before and after 1933

P. 49-61: Part of society. Jewish athletes in Berlin

P.:258-269: Football in the sporting ghetto. The development and importance of Jewish football in the Nazi era

P.79-92: Aspects of a "History of Jewish sports in the area of ​​today's Lower Saxony and Bremen up to the year 1938". First results of a research project

P. 23-40: “Wounds of all kinds”: The Jewish community in Bochum in 1945/46 in the light of other communities founded in the immediate post-war period

P.8-13: Julius Goldschmidt. A Jewish sports patron and manager from Eslohe

Florian Schubert
Political, sports and historical scientists

Co-author/collaboration

P. 108-117: "Anti-Semitism in German football since the 1980s"

P. 64-68: “Anti-Semitism in football. fans and fanaticism"

P. 15-32: "Anti-Semitism in German football since the 1980s and how it has changed."

P.40-43: "Anti-Semitism in German football"

IMG_181811
Dietrich Schulze-Marmeling
Journalist & author

Own works

Co-author/collaboration

Caroline Huber

Co-author/collaboration

de German
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